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cinephilearchive:

Cinematographers — or ‘directors of photography’, if you’re not into the whole brevity thing — have been the unsung heroes of cinema since the year dot. If the writer is a movie’s synapses and the director is its heart, the DP is the eyes. Manipulating light, depth and perspective to elevate even the most simple stories into things of beauty, they are often filmmaking’s unsung heroes. Gregg Toland, Freddie Young, Jack Cardiff, Vittorio Storaro, Conrad Hall, Jordan Cronenweth, Christopher Doyle, Roger Deakins… the roll call of greats is glorious. To celebrate their achievements and demystify their work, Empire’s Film Studies 101 asked 21 of cinema’s top DPs to pick a moment in the history of the art that has inspired and moved them. Empire is proud to share their selections with you. —Top cinematographers reveal their favourite movie moments: 21 DPs pick the shots that inspire them

Required viewing: 110 of the world’s top cinematographers discuss the art of how and why films look the way they do. Cinematographer Style is about the Art and Craft of Cinematography. It is about how everything, from life experiences to technology, influences and shapes an individual’s visual style. Because of the powerful impact that the visual style of a movie can have, this documentary may offer contemporaries valuable insights into the dramatic choices Cinematographers make. And, it is expected that the material will have significant historic value as well.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

cinephilearchive:

“There are people whose ideas are so strong that they seem to glow with creativity. McQueen is one of them.” —Telegraph

The director of ‘Shame, ‘Hunger,’ and ‘12 Years a Slave’—films known for boundary-pushing performances and true-life subject matter—discusses his work spanning the worlds of art and cinema with Stuart Comer, the new chief curator of media and performance art at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Hailed in a 2010 New York Times headline as an “Intense Seeker of Powerful Elegance,” Steve McQueen has become known for his formalism and his willingness to engage with controversial content in powerfully human ways. This dialogue marks McQueen’s first visit to the Walker Cinema.

“We all try to understand what are other filmmakers secrets: how did they start, how did they find money, how did they secured distribution, how did they learn to make movies etc. even though we know that, ultimately, a story never repeats twice. This is particularly true with Steve McQueen, who didn’t follow the ‘traditional route’ (proof is that this 2h conversation happens in an Art Museum with a curator, vs. a theater with a ‘moderator’). I am so used to hear stories of filmmakers either coming from the music videos/commercials or the Festival route, that I never thought there was a third way to go: the Art World. And that’s where McQueen comes from, which makes him all the more fascinating.”

“Because he had no money to shoot feature films, McQueen started shooting short films that (for reasons that are not explained) made it through the Art World and Galleries. Steve McQueen shot 11 short films before Hunger, between 1993 and 2007. It seems that from the get go his first short film, The Bear (1993) gained attention and his fame in the Art World increased until he won the Turner Prize in 1999.

Watch right below ‘Illuminer‘, a video shot in 2002 where McQueen lays on a bed in a hotel room in the dark, while his body reflects the light produced by the TV news about the war in Afghanistan.” —Nathalie, Mentorless

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moviesincolor:





Request Week #11 – mikelitorizMr. Nobody, 2009Cinematography: Christophe Beaucarne
devonleeu:

The Master

Favorite FilmsFull Metal Jacket (1987)

You write ‘born to kill’ on your helmet, and you wear a peace button. What’s that supposed to be, some kind of sick joke?

(via cinemavariety)

cinephilearchive:

With the expert insight of Adrian Curry, author of the Movie Poster of the Week blog at Mubi and the Graphic Detail column in Film Comment magazine, and Dave Kehr of the Museum of Modern Art’s film department, the Vanity Fair curated a collection of the best graphic movie posters of all time.

A mesmerizing look at some of the best movie title sequences of all time, narrated by Bass himself. “To make the ordinary extraordinary” as he puts it toward the end of the video. An amazing talent.

A short featurette examing the collaboration between Alfred Hitchcock and Saul Bass:

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

jackcardiffs:

Nostalghia (1983)

Director: Andrei Tarkovsky
Cinematographer: Giuseppe Lanci

(via tarkovskymalick)

cinephilearchive:

Here’s a great interview with John Cassavetes conducted in 1975 at the American Film Institute in Beverly Hills, California while he was filmmaker in residence there and editing ‘A Woman Under the Influence.’
Click on the image below to enlarge.

Below is an audio excerpt of an interview with John Cassavetes in 1975 in Los Angeles, California on the occasion of his completion and release of ‘A Woman Under the Influence.’

“Cassavetes wiped away the old vocabulary of doing films.” Martin Scorsese speaks the truth. John Cassavetes paved the way for all aspiring filmmakers with his “no-excuses” approach to filmmaking and his high regard for a personal filmmaker’s style. His independently produced films exemplify a cinema of emotion and a specificity of vision that focused on human relationships. As Cassavetes said in all his genius, “Art films aren’t necessarily photography. It’s feeling. If we can capture a feeling of a people, of a way of life, then we made a good picture.” Through his works and insights into filmmaking, John Cassavetes has made a permanent mark on the art of cinema. —Edwin Adrian Nieves
Enjoy these words from Martin Scorsese on “the Father of American Independent Cinema” and then spark your filmmaking passion with Filmmaking Wisdom from John Cassavetes, 5 tips of cinematic goodness presented by A-BitterSweet-Life.

1) Character Is More Important than Plot
The true journey of the film rests not in the mechanics of plot but in the journey of the character within the world presented by the film’s storytelling. For John Cassavetes, the most important thing of all was to present characters truthfully. It is this truthful presentation of character that then allows the audience to immerse itself with the film since the character is the vehicle for the viewer.
2) Don’t Think for the Audience
The filmmaker needs to respect the viewer and let him or her share in the progression of the film story. This allows for the essential quality of the film, which is the essential quality of all art: engaging the audience. The filmmaker should allow the audience to participate in the storytelling, to allow the viewer’s imagination and emotions take part in the film. The story should “evolve, so that people could understand it only gradually as it [goes] along.” Film at its highest offers an experience, and without engaging the viewer, there is no experience.

3) The Script Takes Care of Itself
The script is not the film. It is the blueprint for the film. Viewing the script in this manner opens for the filmmaker the door to further search and discover the storytelling in each stage of filmmaking. The actor as filmmaker is also given the chance to further explore his or her character. Cassavetes based performance on this: Work for the good of your character, do your character. Don’t worry, the script will take care of itself. The script is always there to be an anchor in the filmmaking process.
4) Making the Best of Improvisation
Do not fear the unknown, it is a promising opportunity. However, the most efficient way to make the most of the unknown is by preparing yourself to capture the best of what may come. Cassavetes notes, I write a very tight script, and from there on in I allow the actors to interpret it the way they wish. But once they choose their way, then I’m extremely disciplined—and they must also be extremely disciplined about their own interpretations…there’s a difference between not knowing what to do and just saying something. I believe in improvising on the basis of the written word, and not on undisciplined creativity. Furthermore, improvisation lends itself to all aspects of filmmaking, from the acting to the shooting and editing.

5) Film Is about the Human Experience
The power of cinema is the ability to draw the audience into an intimate relationship with a story that produces an emotional human experience, and this connection comes from the storytelling—the cinematic narration—and not through the technical aspects. John Cassavetes says it so well: People who are making films today are too concerned with mechanics—technical things instead of feeling. Execution is about eight percent to me. The technical quality of a film doesn’t have much to do with whether it’s a good film. I feel like vomiting when some director says to me, “I got the most gorgeous shot today.” That is not what’s important. We have to move beyond the current obsession with technique or angles. It’s a waste of time. A movie is a lot more than a series of shots. You’re doing a bad job if all you’re paying attention to is camera angles: “All right, how can we photograph it? We’ll get the lab to do some special effects there. Say, let’s use a hand-held camera for this shot.” You end up making a film that is all tricks, with no people in it, no knowledge of life. There is nothing left for the actor to bring to it since there is no sense, meaning, or understanding of people.
For more, see our archive under the tag, “John Cassavetes.”

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephilearchive:

The making of David Lynch’s first feature film, ‘Eraserhead.’

“Eraserhead is my most spiritual movie. No one understands when I say that, but it is.” —David Lynch, Catching the Big Fish

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samuraicinema:

"I don’t understand… I just don’t understand. I’ve never heard such a strange story."
Rashomon - Akira Kurosawa